Review: Afterworlds by Scott Westerfeld

Afterworlds by Scott Westerfeld
Published by Simon Pulse on 2014-09-23
Genres: Love & Romance, New Experience, Paranormal, Social Issues, Young Adult
Pages: 640
Format: eARC

Darcy Patel has put college and everything else on hold to publish her teen novel, Afterworlds. Arriving in New York with no apartment or friends she wonders whether she’s made the right decision until she falls in with a crowd of other seasoned and fledgling writers who take her under their wings…

Told in alternating chapters is Darcy’s novel, a suspenseful thriller about Lizzie, a teen who slips into the ‘Afterworld’ to survive a terrorist attack. But the Afterworld is a place between the living and the dead and as Lizzie drifts between our world and that of the Afterworld, she discovers that many unsolved – and terrifying – stories need to be reconciled. And when a new threat resurfaces, Lizzie learns her special gifts may not be enough to protect those she loves and cares about most.

I received this book for free from in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

My Review:

I’m a fan of Scott Westerfeld, but his books make me often frustrated.  He has this knack, this ability to come up with really interesting ideas and then get about 80% of the way into really knocking them out of the park but then the last 20% of that effort just never seems to match up with the rest of it.  I was hoping AFTERWORLDS would finally push that 80% to a 90% or even, dare I say it, 100% … but unfortunately, it fell right into the same trap that LEVIATHAN and UGLIES did for me.

What do I mean by that 80/20% thing?  Well 80% of AFTERWORLDS was absolutely fantastic.  I loved having a heroine last name Patel, I loved hearing descriptions about a life that is different from your average, run-of-the-mill white girl experience that YA fiction seems to center around.  I loved the introduction of a very adult, very out-of-the-norm for YA fiction relationship as well as the family’s reaction to it.  I adored Darcy’s little sister to pieces.  But there were so many missing pieces connecting all of these things that I felt a bit, at the end of the book, as if I’d been smacked around.

While I love the concept of a novel within a novel (and the book is told in alternating chapters, we read Darcy’s story in-between chapters of her own real life story), I think the effort put into creating a book like this means that something had to give.  Unfortunately, in this case, it was Darcy’s real life story.  AFTERWORLDS became more believable in the Afterworlds sections of the book than in the real words section.  I had a hard time getting behind an instant love connection.  I had a very, very hard time with the simplistic budget that Darcy seemed to be able to live on (and honestly, $150k/year is not much at all when it comes to NYC).  It felt very unreal that she was able, for example, to find an apartment that was large enough to host a fairly good size party and she didn’t need a roommate to help with the payment of rent.

Then there’s the Aunt figure, that mysterious family member who is able to grant wishes because it’s inconvenient for the parents to do so.  I just wasn’t buying it all.

That said, I did love the introduction to the Hindu death god, and the whole incorporation of the Hindu religion.  Not something you see in literature and something I would love to see explored more.  I really enjoyed the AFTERWORLD part of the story, and although there were issues there as well, they were nothing as glaring as the real world story.

Would I recommend picking up AFTERWORLDS?  That depends.  If you are a huge fan of Westerfeld and have faith in his ability to tell a good story, yet still can accept some disappointment and move on, then sure – pick it up.  If you don’t want to sink into this 600+ page book without knowing that it will reward you for your efforts, I’d say move on.  In fact, I wish it would have been possible to release this novel in a two-set book or something, allowing us to read AFTERWORLDS before, or after, we read Darcy’s story.  Probably impossible, but something neat to think about.

Check out these reviews!

  • “I think each storyline could stand on its own and be good, but paired, the stories each become exceptional.“ –  ginny writes
  • “The writing is masterful — for both Darcy’s life and Lizzie’s story. The stories, however, weren’t quite as riveting as I’d hoped.” – Proud Book Nerd
  • “I really liked this book and would recommend it to those looking for an unique read or who loves stories within a story. ” – Shelves of Books

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